Why Use Multiple Clouds?

As storing data in the cloud has become ubiquitous and mature, many organizations have adopted a multi-cloud strategy. Eliminating dependence on a single cloud platform is quite a compelling case with benefits of increased reliability, availability, performance, and the avoidance of vendor lock-in and/or specific vendor vulnerabilities to name a few. In short, spanning multiple clouds ensures a business does not have all its eggs (i.e. data) in one basket.

But multi-cloud environments are not without challenges. Taking advantage of the benefits without increasing complexity requires a strategy that ensures applications are not tightly coupled to cloud-specific technologies. Supporting a storage abstraction layer that insulates the application from the underlying cloud provider’s interfaces allows an application to be easily used with multiple clouds. It allows storage features specific to a cloud to be exposed in a standardized manner and enables data to be transparently accessed and migrated as needed in order to take advantage of cloud-specific features without the application being aware of the underlying mechanics, thus reducing or eliminating the limits and vulnerabilities of any one cloud.

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Understanding CDMI and S3 Together

How does the Cloud Data Management Interface (CDMI™) International Standard work? Is it possible be to both S3 and CMDI compliant? What security measures are in place with CDMI? How, and where, is CDMI being deployed? These are just some of the topics we covered at our recent SNIA Cloud Storage Technologies (CSTI) webcast, “Cloud Data Management & Interoperability: Why A CDMI Standard Matters.”

CDMI is intended for application developers who are implementing cloud storage systems, and who are developing applications to manage and consume cloud storage.

Q. Can you compare CDMI to S3? Is it possible to be both CDMI and S3 compliant? Is it too complicated?

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Why Cloud Standards Matter

Effective cloud data management and interoperability is critical for organizations looking to gain control and security over their cloud usage in hybrid and multicloud environments. The Cloud Data Management Interface (CDMI™), also known as the ISO/IEC 17826 International Standard, is intended for application developers who are implementing or using cloud storage systems, and who are developing applications to manage and consume cloud storage. It specifies how to access cloud storage namespaces and how to interoperably manage the data stored in these namespaces. Standardizing the metadata that expresses the requirements for the data, leads to multiple clouds from different vendors treating your data the same.

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Addressing Cloud Security Threats with Standards

In a recent SNIA webinar, Cloud Standards: What They Are, Why You Should Care, the SNIA Cloud Storage Technologies Initiative (CSTI) highlighted some of the key cloud computing standards being developed and published by the ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38 (Cloud Computing and Distributed Platforms) and SC 27 (Information security, cybersecurity and privacy protection) standards committees. While ISO and IEC are not the only organizations producing cloud computing standards and specifications (e.g., ITU-T, OASIS, NIST, ENISA, SNIA, etc.), their standards, sometime developed jointly with ITU-T, can play a role in addressing WTO Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) issues. More importantly, they provide a baseline of cloud terminology, concepts, guidance/requirements, and expectations that are recognized internationally.

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Pay Attention to These Cloud Standards

What’s going on in the world of cloud standards? Since the initial publication of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) definition of cloud computing in NIST SP 800-145 in 2011, international standards development organizations (SDOs) have sought to refine and expand the cloud computing landscape. On February 13, 2020 at our next live SNIA Cloud Storage Technologies Initiative webcast “Cloud Standards: What They Are, Why You Should Care” we will dive into the cloud standards worth noting as Eric Hibbard, standards expert and ISO editor, will discuss:

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